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2019-2020

Time

(Summer 2020)

Cosmo

(Autumn 2019)

Museion

(Spring 2020)

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2018-2019

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Venice

(Summer 2019)

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Islands

(Spring 2019)

Alumnae

(Winter 2018)

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Absence

(Autumn 2018)

2017-2018

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see:one

(2017)

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see:two

(2017)

Boundaries

(2017)

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2016-2017

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Issue 14

(December 2016)

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Issue 15

(February 2017)

2012

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Issue 1

(December 2012)

Online

Brex-on, Brex-off - What the European Union Referendum means for women and people of colour

The leading voices on the EU referendum all come from the same elitist, sexist, Bullingdon club. Illustration: Author's own There are plenty of right (or wrong) and left wing arguments for Brexit. While I recognise all of these points, I still think it is fundamental to realise that most Brexit arguments are xenophobic and do not count the opinions, rights and lives of women and people of colour into account. Like most of Britain’s politics, it is ethnocentric, classist and misogynist. Let me explain to you in a non mansplaining way, why I think this. Brexit is Sexist? Yes. Brexit wishes to diminish the efforts of the EU trade standards, human rights acts and equal pay acts that women and pe

Frames of feminism; some thoughts on feminist cinema

Illustration:[if gte vml 1]><o:wrapblock><v:shapetype id="_x0000_t75" coordsize="21600,21600" o:spt="75" o:preferrelative="t" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" filled="f" stroked="f"> <v:stroke joinstyle="miter"></v:stroke> <v:formulas> <v:f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></v:f> <v:f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></v:f> <v:f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></v:f> <v:f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></v:f> <v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f> <v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f> <v:f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></v:f> <v:f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></v:f> <v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f> <v:f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></v:f> <v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f> <v:f eqn="sum @10 216

Imran Qureshi, Where the Shadows are so Deep at the Barbican’s Curve Gallery

The contemporary Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi describes his own work as a creative impulse to “paint the process of miniature painting”, a practice found in the royal courts of Delhi at least five centuries ago. The artist’s most recent solo-exhibition, ‘Where the Shadows are so Deep’, at the Barbican’s Curve Gallery (18 February – 10 July 2016) calls attention to this artistic endeavor. Traditionally, miniature painting is known to be an art of mimicry, not an outcome of original creativity. Qureshi, however, has been described as a “master miniaturist” with “bigger things on his mind”. Transforming the Curve into a darkened, mausoleum-like space, Qureshi’s miniatures appear dazzlingly i

'Russia and the Arts: The Age of Tolstoy and Tchaikovsky,' National Portrait Gallery, London

The ‘Vogue100’ show at the National Portrait Gallery is proudly boasted as its blockbuster, and it certainly is a dazzling draw. However, before venturing into the vast Vogue space veer right into the ‘Russia and the Arts’ exhibition, and languish in the calm before the stylish storm of bombast and swagger. The portraits in ‘Russia and the Arts’ modestly, yet majestically, occupy two rooms. The curators have abandoned any sort of chronological layout; a thematic organisation instead effectively ensures a reminder of Russian critics and writers, great novelists, actors, composers, patrons of the arts and poets. This arrangement also lays out an overview of Russian realism, impressionism and s

Pre-Raphaelites on Paper: Victorian Drawings from the Lanigan Collection - Leighton House Museum

Illustration by Author Leighton House Museum’s latest exhibition is a commemoration of a promised gift to the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, from one of the most significant private collections in North America. The group of eighty drawings was collected by Dr Dennis T. Lanigan, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon whose fascination with Victorian art stemmed from a chance visit to the major Edward Burne-Jones retrospective in 1976 at the Hayward Gallery. Supplemented by a selection of forty-two other drawings from the collections of the National Gallery of Canada and Leighton House Museum itself, the exhibition is a celebration of Victorian draughtsmanship and design. Five broad sections

The National Gallery's 'Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art'

The latest installment in a line of ‘blockbuster exhibitions' sweeping Europe, the National Gallery's ‘Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art' has received mixed reviews. Well, mixed in the sense that they vary from neutral to outright condemnation. Lacking his iconic large scale canvases, for hard-core fans the number of Delacroix's in the exhibition will be disappointing. In fact, the extensive pilfering of the permanent collection might have regulars irritated by the lack of new work at all. Yet, for the uninitiated this exhibition offers a refreshing approach, crediting the viewer with intelligence but not prior knowledge. Most interestingly, it avoids the tedious biographic spiel that see

Three of the Best Gardens

Illustration by Author We’ve all got a lot of stuff to do - heads to stuff with facts, sinuses to un-stuff. Or maybe you’re a newly elected SU member, rubbing your hands together ready to rid an arguably (everything is always arguable) hegemonic system of its stuffy ways. Regardless, no one wants to end up looking like the bat-sh**, googly-eyed cartoon that’s widely used to advertise sour sweets (see Brain Blasterz or WarHeads for more info, but by god don’t eat). So, here are three of central London’s best secret gardens where you can breathe, relax, unwind and get loose, but not too loose because they’re still public spaces: St George’s Gardens Proves little is lovely and still does the jo

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The Courtauld Institute of Art

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London

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the.courtauldian@courtauld.ac.uk

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