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2019-2020

Time

(Summer 2020)

Cosmo

(Autumn 2019)

Museion

(Spring 2020)

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2018-2019

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Venice

(Summer 2019)

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Islands

(Spring 2019)

Alumnae

(Winter 2018)

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Absence

(Autumn 2018)

2017-2018

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(2017)

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see:two

(2017)

Boundaries

(2017)

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2016-2017

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Issue 14

(December 2016)

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Issue 15

(February 2017)

2012

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Issue 1

(December 2012)

Online

Christoforos Savva in Venice: An Interview with Andre Zivanari

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). For the 58th Venice Biennale, Cyprus is being represented by Christoforos Savva (1924-1968), an artist whose inclusion is packed with meaning. 2019 brings the 50-year anniversary of Cyprus being represented for the first time in the Biennale, an entry in which Savva was featured. It also marks 50 years since the artist’s sudden death. ‘Untimely, Again’ (curated by Jacopo Crivelli Visconti) is a celebration of the artist’s contributions to Cyprus’ art scene in the twentieth century, but also of Cypriot culture generally. I had the pleasure of interviewing Andre Zivanari, director of the non-profit foundation Poi

Venice: Eat, Pray, Love (But Mainly Eat)

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). “I wish Giovanni would kiss me,” is the first line of Elizabeth Gilbert’s 2006 book, Eat, Pray, Love. This book was later adapted to the big screen, with Julia Roberts as the lead, of course. On the 6am flight to Venice in early June, it was this film that kept me from dozing off and giving my eyes the well-needed rest that they would have deserved after only two hours of sleep the night before. Instead, I was training myself for the marvels of Italy and, more precisely, the microcosmic world of Venetian food, envisioning myself in the shoes of Liz ordering antipasti, primi piatti, secondi piatti and dolce… and

Why I Can't Stop Thinking About 'Barca Nostra'

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). I was, admittedly, a little nervous to write this piece concerning the Barca Nostra (Our Boat) at the Venice Biennale. Firstly, because I have never been to the Venice Biennale, or any biennale for that matter. Correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe the general rule for reviewing something as subjective as a piece of exhibited work is that it is only accurate when one has experienced its impact first hand. Secondly, the sheer volume of published articles on Christoph Büchel’s Barca Nostra is enough to make anyone feel intimidated. If we were to amalgamate the general information from these (varying in opinion m

A Ten-Year Long Reflection on La Serenissima

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). Let’s be honest, I barely remember that trip to Venice in October of 2009. I tell myself that it’s because it was a quick four-day holiday. I guess my family needed a few days to disconnect from the franticness of Rome. I do seem to have some sporadic photographic snippets of the city in my brain; although those might actually be more bodily feelings than actual memories. Upon reflection, I realize that these feelings have been formed through other unrelated experiences and have been masked as being from my nine-year-old self in Venice. In reality, that trip is a memory that I have constructed to fit in with th

The Music of the Lagoon

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). "In every home, someone is playing a musical instrument or singing. There is music everywhere." – Anon, Seventeenth Century It is very hard to walk along the narrow alleys or through the bright, little squares of Venice without hearing, in your mind, the most beautiful music. Be it from the forest of bell towers or the lilting song of the gondoliers, the city in the lagoon seems to sing a thousand melodies, all of which are harmonised by the gentle lapping of the green-blue waters against ancient walls. Long before Vienna rose to musical capital of Europe, Venice was nurturing a generation of great composers. I

The Poets of Venice - 'Around me are the Stars and Waters'

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). To call Venice a city of ghosts is painfully cliché. But what isn’t cliché about the famous floating city – La Serenissima, the ‘most serene’ city? As literature’s love affair with Venice continues doggedly into its sixth century, poets and writers persistently attempt to revive the lost romanticism of the crumbling coloured façades, the slow gondolas traversing the Grand Canal and the view across the lagoon to the swiss-cheese exterior of the Doge’s Palace. On the one hand, nothing appears changed from the Venice that belonged to the Romantics – the city still sings of those poet-traps; sun, ruin, colour, hist

'Holding Up a Mirror' to Malaysia and the World

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). This year has seen Malaysia grace the Venice Biennale for the first time. As a Malaysian who has spent a long time away from home, the news came as a pleasant surprise. The story of the Malaysian Pavilion in Venice began with the 2018 elections. It marked a watershed in Malaysian politics. Prior to the elections, the presiding establishment had been wracked by a corruption scandal. In 2015, the acting prime minister, Najib Razak, and his cohorts were implicated in embezzling the nation’s sovereign wealth fund, to finance everything from buying Monets, to funding The Wolf of Wall Street (you’re welcome). The sca

'Don't Look Now': Venice in Film

This article was previously published in the special edition, VENICE (July 2019). ‘Venice is like a city in aspic, wrapped over from a dinner party, where all the guests are dead or gone,’ utters an elderly blind psychic around the ninety-minute mark of Nicolas Roeg’s 1973 cult thriller Don’t Look Now. All milky-eyed and with silent footsteps in a peculiar patent green coat, she conjures the image of a city pickled in gelatine. It could also be the island equivalent of Damien Hirst’s formaldehyde menagerie, the antithesis to our loved ones’ gondola clad postcards from summers spent in the city. Still from 'Don't Look Now', 1973, dir. Nicolas Roeg (Image: Eldorado Films & Studio Canal) In an

Alexandra Morris

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). MA 2008 Alexandra Morris has been working successfully in New York and Mexico’s art business world since 2010. After an undergraduate degree in History of Art, she completed a Courtauld master’s in British Modernism in 2008, attributed her academic writing skills and career-oriented mindset to her time spent at the institute. She went on to complete a Christie’s master’s degree in History of Art and Art-World Practice, and shortly after, Morris founded ‘Alex Em/Fine Art’; an art collection consulting firm, overseeing private art collections in the US, UK, the Middle East, and Latin America. In 2017, Morris

Valeria Bembry

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). PG Dip 2008 Valeria Missalina Bembry began her career in humanitarian communications as an Assistant Press Officer at the international development charity, ActionAid, after completing her BA in International Relations. She later became a Peace Corps Volunteer in Madagascar where she taught English, trained Malagasy teachers in TEFL methodologies and organised recreational activities for at-risk youth. A fellow volunteer’s project marketing textiles designed by local women inspired Bembry to pursue a career combining supporting creative communities and culture in humanitarian settings. She enrolled in The

Deirdre Murphy

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). 1975 - 2018 MA 2002 Deirdre Murphy started her career as a producer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, after gaining a first-class History degree from Dalhousie University. She came to London in 2001 to study an MA in the History of Dress at The Courtauld: it was here that she discovered her love for textiles, and soon after leaving The Courtauld she became a curator for the Manchester Gallery of Costume at the V&A. She went on to join the Historic Royal Palaces team at Kensington Palace in 2003, where for the next decade and a half she presided over the collections as an influential and proactive

Naomi Beckwith

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). MA 1999 With a BA in History from Northwestern University, Naomi Beckwith arrived at The Courtauld in 1998, where her MA thesis focused on Adrian Piper and Carrie Mae Weems. From 2007 to 2011, Beckwith was an associate curator at the Studio Museum in Harlem, an American art museum devoted to exhibiting works by both emerging and established artists of African descent. Here she curated her first key exhibition, 30 Seconds off an Inch, in 2009, presenting works by an international roster of artists, the majority artists of colour, and questioning how social statements can be expressed in art. Photograph by N

Nancy Ireson

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). BA 1999, MA 2000, PhD 2007 Currently the Deputy Director for Collections and Exhibitions for the illustrious Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nancy Ireson is a true Courtauldian, having spent her entire academic career at the Courtauld Institute of Art – obtaining a BA in History of Art, an MA in European Art, and a PhD on the work of Henri Rousseau. Her research is particularly based in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century European art. After her time at The Courtauld, Ireson quickly developed an incredible résumé of experience in some of the world’s most prestigious art institutio

Nicole Krauss

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). MA 1998 Nicole Krauss is an inspirational figure for using her experience at The Courtauld far beyond the traditional boundaries of Art History. Growing up on Long Island in a British-American family, Krauss started writing as a teenager, publishing her poetry from a young age. She enrolled at Stanford University in 1992, majoring in English and winning multiple awards and prizes for her poetry, as well as the Dean’s Award for academic achievement. In 1996, Krauss was awarded a Marshall Scholarship, allowing her to study for a MA at Oxford and then The Courtauld, where she studied seventeenth-century Dutch

Beth Greenacre

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). BA 1997 Beth Greenacre is a leading force in the British contemporary art world. A curator and art consultant specialising in Modern British and International Contemporary art, she graduated from The Courtauld in 1997 with a BA in the History of Art, moving into the curatorial art world soon after. Greenacre started working closely with David Bowie, one of the most influential musicians of the twentieth century, from 2000 after meeting the singer shortly after graduating. She curated his collection of (mostly) Modern British painting and sculpture (containing works by Frank Auerbach, Peter Lanyon, and Grah

HRH Princess Sumaya bint El Hassan

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). BA 1992 HRH Princess Sumaya bint El Hassan of Jordan was educated in Amman, Jordan and in the UK. She graduated from The Courtauld with a BA specialising in early Islamic art and architecture and their relationships with other cultures. Though an art historian by training, Princess Sumaya has developed a prominent career in the promotion of science, technology and cultural heritage in Jordan and beyond. Her career today reflects her passion for art and her belief in the potential of creative science and technology to improve lives. She is Vice-Chair of the Jordan Museum, which she helped to found and now d

Kaywin Feldman

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). MA 1991 Since her graduation from The Courtauld in 1991, Kaywin Feldman has held the role of Director in three separate cultural institutions, and commencing 11th March 2019, this number will become four. Recently appointed as the Director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, Feldman will be the first woman to tackle this internationally important role, her next in a list of impressive career developments. Before starting at The Courtauld, Feldman did her undergraduate degree in archaeology at the University of Michigan. Following this, she completed a master’s degree at the Institute of Archaeolo

Frances Morris

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). MA 1983 Tate Modern is definitively one of the most popular art museums in the world, and Frances Morris has been fundamentally involved in its development since its opening in 2000. Joining Tate as a curator in 1987, she was promoted to be the inaugural Head of Displays at Tate Modern, later Head of International Collections, a post she held for a decade – until her appointment as Director in 2016. She is not only the first woman to lead Tate Modern, but also the first Tate ‘insider’ to rise to this position, as previous directors have been brought in from the glittering European art scene. Morris is re

Brett Rogers

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). MA 1981 When Brett Rogers, the current Director of the Photographers’ Gallery, arrived at The Courtauld in 1980, photography was not a topic studied! Throughout her career, Rogers has played a key role in promoting this previously ignored medium, both in the UK and abroad. Born in Australia, Rogers completed a degree in Fine Arts before moving to London to start an MA course in European post-War art. She explored the history of surrealist exhibitions as a way to sidestep The Courtauld’s restrictive syllabus – though she couldn’t study photography in its own right, this choice of subject allowed her to rese

Betty Churcher

This article was previously published in the special edition, ALUMNAE (December 2018). 1932 - 2015 MA 1977 Artist, art critic, television presenter, author, gallery director, and, of course, Courtauldian. Betty Churcher’s commitment to the arts and undeniable talent in bringing them to the masses still lingers in institutions she occupied over her life. Born in Queensland, Australia, during the Depression, Churcher’s devotion to the arts was often tested by her father’s insistence that she would not be in need of an education past Year 10. Prevailing, though, was her vigour and determination and after obtaining a place to study under Patricia Prentice, and later Caroline Baker, it is evident

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